100 Greatest Films of All Time
Part 4

by FilmFour




Film Four's
100 Greatest Films of All Time

(part 4, ranked)


76. THE PRODUCERS (1968)
Quite possibly Brooks's finest hour (although Blazing Saddles gives it a run for its money), The Producers blends out-and-out slapstick with satire daring enough in its subject matter to raise a few eyebrows even today.
77. THREE COLOURS: BLUE (1993), THREE COLOURS: WHITE (1993), THREE COLOURS: RED (1994)
Extraordinary classic films of modern European cinema. Breathtaking cinematography, a magnificent score and mesmerising performances create a truly superlative experience.
78. CABARET (1972)
Fosse's extraordinary adaptation of the Kander-Ebb musical won eight Academy Awards including those for Best Director (Fosse), Best Actress (Minnelli) and Best Supporting Actor (Grey).
79. GOLDFINGER (1964)
James takes on nasty Auric Goldfinger, who has a dastardly plan to irradiate the US gold reserves with the help of Pussy Galore, in the best of the early Bond movies.

80. SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS (1937)
One of the all-time great Disney animations, and an unexpectedly resonant story, with oh-so-demure Snow White brilliantly counterpoised by the Wicked Queen and those great character 'actors' - the dwarves.

81. THE GOLD RUSH (1925)
The Tramp ventures into the Klondike in search of romance and riches, but finds only misery and munchable footwear in an all-time favourite from one of Britain's most gifted sons.

82. HIGH NOON (1952)
Marshal Will Kane (Gary Cooper) awaits the arrival of a killer in this minimalist but powerful western. A devastating rehearsal of what would come to be one of the genre's major concerns.

83. SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER (1977)
Classic 70s disco movie with a star-making turn from John Travolta that explores the simmering frustrations of youth to the most memorable of soundtracks.
84. THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD (1938)
A massive (by 30s' standards) budget ensured the sets, costume and colour were as spectacular as the swordfighting. An inspiration for later blockbusting epics such as Star Wars and Indiana Jones and as the tagline said, 'Only the rainbow can capture its brilliance!' Quite.
85. ENTER THE DRAGON (1973)
In the film that saw Bruce Lee finally achieve true global stardom, the Dragon takes on an entire army on a remote island. And wins. The chop-socky film to beat them all.
86. BREATHLESS (A BOUT DE SOUFFLE) (1960)
Paris never looked more romantic than in this fractured, amoral tale of a Bogart-obsessed fantasist who shoots a cop and takes up with an old flame.
87. ICE COLD IN ALEX (1958)
Fondly remembered as a Sunday TV fixture, this WWII yarn about the crew of an army ambulance stuck in the desert achieves classic status through its powerfully straightforward storytelling and a quality supporting cast.
88. BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN (1925)
Eisenstein's celebrated documentary style re-creation of the 1905 anti-Tsarist uprising by Russian sailors is a meticulous exercise in montage, stirring visuals - and propaganda.
89. THE AFRICAN QUEEN (1951)
C.S. Forester's straightforward adventure story became a beautifully understated yet unforgettably steamy and tense thriller in the hands of John Huston. Sizzles with the chemistry between stars Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn.
90. THE GENERAL (1926)
There's love, locomotives and laughs in this great silent comedy set during the American Civil War starring, co-written by and directed by the inimitable Buster Keaton.
91. A HARD DAY'S NIGHT (1964)
The Beatles' first movie, documenting a fictional day in the life of John, Paul, George and Ringo. Madcap adventures and classic songs abound.
92. WAY OUT WEST (1937)
The finest comic duo in cinema venture to the Wild West, with hilarious results. A parade of perfect gags are given a human dimension by Ollie and Stan's inimically immature antics.
93. HENRY V (1944)
Definitive screen version of the Bard's most patriotic work, featuring an amazing man-of-the-match performance from Laurence Olivier who somehow fitted directing and producing duties around his sensational leading turn.
94. EASY RIDER (1969)
Drug-runners (Fonda, Hopper and Nicholson) take to their choppers and discover an intolerant America on the proceeds of a coke deal. The film that became an anthem for the 60s cultural dialogue on freedom, individualism and patriotism.

95. MY BEAUTIFUL LAUNDRETTE (1985)
One of only a handful of homegrown 80s hits, this touching film, scripted by Hanif Kureshi, introduced Daniel Day-Lewis and broke barriers with its central gay romance.

96. BELLE DE JOUR (1967)
A stunning psychological drama about a bored housewife's bizarre sexual fantasies from director Luis Buñuel, featuring a career-best performance from Catherine Deneuve.

97. THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1935)
A tour-de-force of gothic expressionism from an early master of horror. Although the film is already parodying the genre, there's plenty of pathos and intelligence in this beautifully crafted and moving story.
98. THE TERMINATOR (1984)
The sci-fi thriller that launched the careers of James Cameron and Arnold Schwarzenegger into the stratosphere is still endlessly entertaining.

99. SATURDAY NIGHT AND SUNDAY MORNING (1960)
A very young Albert Finney makes his debut as a prototypically Angry Young Man in this ground-breaking piece of social realism - experimental for its times, and still a fascinating study of youthful post-war disaffection.

100. DO THE RIGHT THING (1989)
Tempers finally boil over in Brooklyn, NY, after a long, stiflingly hot summer day of racial and familial tension in Lee's deft mix of comedy and acute social observation.



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