Timeline of Greatest Film
Milestones and Turning Points
in Film History


The Year 1911

Timeline of Greatest Film History Milestones and Turning Points
(by decade and year)
Introduction | Pre-1900s | 1900s | 1910s | 1920s | 1930s | 1940s | 1950s
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1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919

The Year 1911
Year
Event and Significance
1911
The first US 'feature film' was released when the two parts of D. W. Griffith's Enoch Arden were screened together, running twice the normal length of films at the time. The two parts became a two-reel featurette shown in its entirety - an industry first.
1911
The first feature-length film to be released in its entirety in the US was the 69-minute fantasy/horror epic Dante's Inferno (It.) (aka L’Inferno), inspired by Dante's 14th century poem The Divine Comedy. It opened in New York on December 10, 1911 at Gane’s Manhattan Theatre. It was made by three directors Francesco Bertolini, Giuseppe de Liguoro, and Adolfo Padovan, took two years to make, and cost over $180,000. It was also the first non-erotic film to feature full-frontal male nudity.
1911
Pennsylvania became the first state to pass a film censorship law.
1911
New York Herald comic-strip animator Winsor McCay (and James Stuart Blackton) debuted his first cartoon, Little Nemo (with 4,000 hand-drawn cels, and hand-colored). Two of the film's ten minutes were animated. The semi-autobiographical film brought to life his cartoon characters from his popular comic strip Little Nemo in Slumberland (also titled In the Land of Wonderful Dreams in the Hearst papers).
1911
The first US fan magazine Motion Picture Story Magazine debuted in February. The Moving Picture World and The Motion Picture News also offered interviews and gossipy columns about the personal lives and careers of the stars.
1911
IMP star Florence Lawrence was interviewed in 1911 in Motion Picture Story Magazine - often considered the first movie star interview.
1911
The Nestor Company built the first full-time studio in a district of Los Angeles known as Hollywood. It was the first movie studio based in Hollywood. As a result of the independents desire to escape the restrictions of the MPPC, Hollywood was soon to become the motion-picture capital of the world.
1911
Credits began to appear regularly at the beginning of motion pictures.
1911
Pathe's Weekly was the first regularly-released US newsreel.


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