Timeline of Greatest Film
Milestones and Turning Points
in Film History


The Year 1982

Timeline of Greatest Film History Milestones and Turning Points
(by decade and year)
Introduction | Pre-1900s | 1900s | 1910s | 1920s | 1930s | 1940s | 1950s
1960s | 1970s | 1980s | 1990s | 2000s | 2010s
1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989

The Year 1982
Year
Event and Significance
1982
Jim Clark founded Silicon Graphics, a cutting-edge company that contributed to the growth of computer imaging and animation in films.
1982
Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982) just beat Tron (1982) into release, to attain the honor of being the first film to use computer-generated images (CGI) to any extent. In Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, the "Genesis Effect" sequence was cinema's first entirely computer-generated (CG) sequence. This visual effect, a brief fully computer-generated sequence lasting about one minute, marked the first use of a fractal-generated landscape in a film (created by the Lucasfilm division of Pixar at ILM), and a particle-rendering system (for the fire effect).
1982
Columbia Studios broke the previous record (set for My Fair Lady (1964)) when in 1978, it purchased intellectual property film rights to Annie (1982), to be directed by John Huston, for $9.5 million.
1982
In March 1982, Claus von Bülow was found guilty of twice attempting to murder his socialite wife Sunny von Bülow. In June of 1985, he was granted a new trial and was eventually acquitted on both counts. Reversal of Fortune (1990), starring Best Actor-winning Jeremy Irons, was based on the case.
1982
TV's Saturday Night Live regular Eddie Murphy became a big-screen star with his debut feature film performance in the action-comedy 48 Hrs. (1982), playing convict Reggie Hammond opposite Nick Nolte as SF Detective Sgt. Jack Cates. The influential film was the first "buddy-cop" film, and spawned such imitators as the Beverly Hills Cop (1984) series, the Lethal Weapon (1987) series, and more. Murphy was the first actor to be paid $1 million for his feature debut film.
1982
Walt Disney Studios' Tron (1982) was released as both a feature film (with more state-of-the-art computer-generated animation than any other film) and an arcade video game. This film was heralded as the first live action film with over 20 minutes of full 3D graphics and computer animation (extensive use of 3-D CGI in the famed 'light cycle' sequence). However, the film's failure at the box-office held up greater development of computer animation.
1982
Director Steven Spielberg's E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (1982) was released -- another all-time champion blockbuster. It was the highest-grossing film up to its time (and of 1982), originally earning $359 million (and eventually taking in a domestic lifetime gross of $435 million). Special effects were produced by George Lucas' Industrial Light and Magic (ILM) Company. It greatly surpassed the second-place film of 1982, the popular comedy Tootsie (1982) which earned only $177 million. The sci-fi drama about a lost, loveable alien did very well at the Academy Awards, taking home four Oscars from its nine nominations: Best Original Score, Best Sound, Best Sound Effects Editing, and Best Visual Effects.
1982
During the making of Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983) during the summer of 1982, two child actors (My-ca Dinh Le and Renee Chen) and Vic Morrow (the father of actress Jennifer Jason Leigh) were killed in a freak helicopter crash, on July 23rd. As a result, greater precautions would be taken on Hollywood sets through the passage of reformed US child labor laws and safety regulations. Almost a half decade later in 1987, director John Landis and four others were acquitted of involuntary manslaughter.
1982
Princess Grace of Monaco, formerly actress Grace Kelly (born in Philadelphia), died at age 52 of injuries from a car crash in Monaco when she suffered a heart attack/stroke while driving. During her brief six-year film career (1951-1956), she rose to prominence after appearing in High Noon (1952) opposite Gary Cooper, and opposite Clark Gable and Ava Gardner in Mogambo (1953). She appeared in three of Hitchcock's thrillers: Dial M for Murder (1954), To Catch a Thief (1955) and then opposite James Stewart in Hitchcock's Rear Window (1954) - her most memorable role. She won a Best Actress Oscar for The Country Girl (1954). Her last film was MGM's musical High Society (1956), after which she retired and married Prince Rainier III in 1956.
1982
Ex NBC-TV Saturday Night Live comic and film actor John Belushi died at the age of 33, of an accidental drug overdose. His most notable films were (National Lampoon's) Animal House (1978) and The Blues Brothers (1980).
1982
The first feature-length, free-form 'music video' film was Alan Parker's Pink Floyd The Wall (1982), based on the 1979 Pink Floyd album The Wall.
1982
Michael Jackson’s Thriller album was released in November of 1982. The short music video film Thriller would debut in the next year.
1982
The biggest home-video seller from 1983-1985 was Jane Fonda's exercise video titled Workout (aka Jane Fonda's Workout), first released in April of 1982. The trend continued in 1986 (the top seller was Jane Fonda's New Workout) and in 1987 (Jane Fonda's Low-Impact Aerobic Workout). The videotape revolutionized the video industry, with numerous celebrities imitating Fonda with their own fitness and diet videotapes.
1982
Only one actor in film history (to date), James Coco, was nominated for two opposing awards in the same year, an Oscar and Razzie, for his supporting role in Only When I Laugh (1981).
1982
The soft-drink giant Coca Cola Company bought Columbia Pictures in a $750 million transaction. In 1982, a Columbia movie, Gandhi (1982), won the Academy Award for Best Picture, and the Company secured its first Oscar. The biopic won eight total Academy Awards, including Best Director (Richard Attenborough), Best Actor (Ben Kingsley), and Best Original Screenplay. The newly-organized studio Tri-Star Pictures was formed by CBS Television, HBO (Home Box Office) and Columbia Pictures.
1982
Louis Gossett, Jr. was the third African-American performer to win a competitive Oscar and the first to win Best Supporting Actor, for his performance as the tough, principled drill sergeant Emil Foley in An Officer and a Gentleman (1982).
1982
After a contractual dispute, film critics Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel left the PBS-TV show Sneak Previews in 1982 to start At the Movies, owned by the Tribune Company's multimedia subsidiary Tribune Entertainment, which also owned Siskel's review newspaper. The name of the show was taken from their show's sign-off phrase: "We'll see you at the movies." They developed the "thumbs up-thumbs down" rating system as a permanent trademarked feature of the show.

Siskel and Ebert remained on the nationally-syndicated show until 1986, when they had another dispute (with Tribune Entertainment), and left to create a new Disney-produced show (Buena Vista Television), titled Siskel & Ebert & the Movies. [When they left in 1982, Sneak Previews continued until 1996, first with New York film critic Jeffrey Lyons and Detroit Free Press critic Neal Gabler, until Gabler left in 1985 and was replaced with Michael Medved.]


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