Timeline of Greatest Film
Milestones and Turning Points
in Film History


The Year 2014

Timeline of Greatest Film History Milestones and Turning Points
(by decade and year)
Introduction | Pre-1900s | 1900s | 1910s | 1920s | 1930s | 1940s | 1950s
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2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

The Year 2014
Year
Event and Significance
2014
In early 2014, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) announced a year-long global campaign to honor the studio's storied 90-year legacy. Founded in 1924 when theater magnate Marcus Loew bought and merged Metro Pictures Corp. with Goldwyn Pictures and Louis B. Mayer Productions, MGM and its legendary roaring lion logo signified the golden era of Hollywood to film lovers around the world. Since its inception, the company led the industry in creating some of Hollywood's greatest stars and was home to over 175 Academy Award®-winning films, including 14 Best Pictures. Several of MGM's more recent signature films included The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966, It.), Rocky (1976), RoboCop (1987), Rain Man (1988), and Fargo (1996).
2014
12 Years A Slave (2013) won Best Picture, while Gravity (2013) took home the most honors with seven Oscars. 12 Years A Slave marked the first time in Oscar history that a movie directed by a black filmmaker (Steve McQueen) won Best Picture. 12 Years A Slave joined Argo (2012) and Crash (2005) as the only Best Picture winners in the last 30 years to win three or less Oscars. Interestingly, all three films won Best Picture without winning the Best Director Oscar. Gravity was the first film since Cabaret (1972) (with eight wins) to win seven or more Oscars and still not win Best Picture. Gravity's director Alfonso Cuaron became the first Mexican and Latino to win Best Director.
2014
The Great Beauty (2013) was the 14th Italian film to win the Foreign Language Film Oscar. No other country has won more trophies.
2014
By winning the Best Animated Feature Oscar prize, Disney's hit musical Frozen (2013) became the first non-Pixar, Walt Disney Animation Studios film to win the Best Animated Feature prize since the category was created in 2001. By springtime of 2014, Disney's Frozen (2013), a loose retelling of Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale "The Snow Queen," became the highest-grossing animated movie of all time. It overtook Toy Story 3 (2010) (the first animated movie in history to cross the $1 billion mark) in the top spot, with its estimated worldwide box-office haul of $1.072 billion, and continued to grow from there.
2014
2014 has been dubbed by some as the year of the "Christian-centric film" - with the releases of Paramount's action epic Noah (2014), the independent Christian film God's Not Dead (2014), Mark Burnett and Roma Downey’s flick Son of God (2014) with Portuguese actor Diogo Morgado reprising his role from the hit History Channel's mini-series The Bible, and Sony's Heaven Is For Real (2014). Others included: the faith and family-focused comedy Moms' Night Out (2014), the Christian political drama Persecuted (2014), Nicolas Cage's Left Behind (2014), and Fox’s biblical tale Exodus: Gods and Kings (2014) starring Christian Bale as Moses.

Hollywood had been impressed by the tremendous success of Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ (2004) a decade earlier, and set up numerous branch studios with faith-based divisions (20th Century Fox's FoxFaith and Sony's Cloud Ten Pictures were both short-lived, however). Currently, there is a newfound confidence in Christian-themed content, now that there is less fresh material in mainstream films (evidenced by numerous reboots, sequels, and remakes).
2014
Three notable film deaths occurred early in the year: (1) versatile and prolific actor and director Philip Seymour Hoffman died at the age of 46 on February 2, 2014 of combined drug intoxication; (2) 1930s child star Shirley Temple (Black), one of the greatest screen legends of all-time, died on February 10, 2014 at the age of 85; and (3) Mickey Rooney died at the age of 93 on April 6, 2014 - he was one of the longest surviving film stars of the classic Hollywood era.


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