Greatest Funniest Movie Moments and Scenes

Part 16


Greatest and Funniest Movie Scenes
Film Title/Year and Brief Funniest Scenes Description
Screenshots

Ruthless People (1986)

Unscrupulous fashion designer and wealthy California businessman Sam Stone's (Danny De Vito) opening monologue about his vulgar wife Barbara (Bette Midler): "God, I hate that woman. I - I - I hate the way she licks stamps! I hate her furniture! And I hate that little sound she makes when she sleeps"; also Barbara's comment about her kidnappers ("Nice faces. Nice identifiable faces!") and her abuse of them, including her tearful reaction to her ransom dropping from $250,000 to $10,000: ("I'm being marked down?... I've been kidnapped by K-Mart!"); Police Chief Henry Benton's (William G. Schilling) video of having sex with a prostitute in his car being shown on a department store's rows of televisions (an offscreen woman cries out: "That's my husband!"), and Lt. Walters' (Clarence Felder) remark about bumbling, dim-witted blackmailer Eart Mott (Bill Pullman): "This could very well be the stupidest man on Earth"; also Barbara's over-the-top desire for revenge against her husband: ("His testicles! I want his testicles!")


Safety Last (1923)

The mild-mannered and timid Boy's (Harold Lloyd) suspenseful, slapstick-filled daredevil climb up the side of a twelve-story building in the big city, culminating in the famous image of him hanging from the arms of a huge clock high above the busy street below - at every floor, the Boy is beset by an incredible array of problems (pesky, flapping pigeons who feast on nuts that have fallen on him from above, a tennis net that becomes enveloped around him, painters who thrust a protruding two by four paint platform at him, a swinging window, a rope, a vicious dog, a flagpole, a mouse which climbs up his pants leg, a photographic subject who is posing with a gun pointed at him at the exact moment the flash explodes, a revolving weather vane, and a second rope entangled around his ankle which swings him pendulum-like from the top of the building), culminating with the enormous clock

Scrooged (1988)

Mean-spirited and selfish IBC Network-TV executive Francis Xavier "Frank" Cross' (Bill Murray) encounter with the sing-song, squeaky-voiced, physically-abusive, sweetly-violent, and sadistically-gleeful fairy-like Ghost of Christmas Present (Carol Kane), who pulls him by the tie, pushes him, head-butts him, and then upper-cuts him with a toaster oven, among other abuses: (Ghost (gleefully): "You know I like the rough stuff, don't you, Frank?"); and the outrage of the network's Lady Censor (Kate McGregor-Stewart) over the exposed nipples of one of the Solid Gold Dancers' costumes for a multi-million dollar Christmas Eve performance of a musical titled Scrooge! (Frank: "I want to see her nipples." Censor: "But this is a Christmas show." Frank: "Well, Charles Dickens would have wanted to see her nipples, then"), in this only mildly-funny updating of the Dickens' A Christmas Carol


The Seven Year Itch (1955)

The "balcony scene" in which light-headed and voluptuous upstairs neighbor - The Girl (Marilyn Monroe) tells married New Yorker neighbor Richard Sherman (Tom Ewell): "Let me just go put something on. I'll go into the kitchen and get dressed... when it's hot like this - you know what I do? I keep my undies in the icebox"; and the middle-aged, nudism-loving health-food waitress' (Doro Merande) espousal to Richard of the virtues of naturism: "...Clothes are the enemy. Without clothes, there would be no sickness, there'd be no war. I ask you, sir: Can you imagine two great armies on the battlefield, no uniforms, completely nude? No way of telling friend from foe, all brothers together"


Shampoo (1975)

The liberated behavior of seductive Beverly Hills hairdresser George Roundy (Warren Beatty) who tells his pert girlfriend Jill (Goldie Hawn) when she stumbles upon him in bed with her friend in a boathouse during a party: "Honey, where have you been? We've been looking all over for you"; and the scene of George's ex girlfriend Jackie (Julie Christie) telling Sid Roth (William Castle) about her sexual desires: "Most of all, I'd like to suck his c--k" - pointing to George sitting next to her at the dinner table and causing him to choke on a piece of chicken

She Done Him Wrong (1933)

Another of voluptuous Mae West's funny vehicles as an excuse to throw off one liners ("You know, it takes two to get one in trouble"), naughty innuendoes (the famed "Why don't you come up sometime 'n see me? I'm home every evening"), and other quips ("Listen, when women go wrong, men go right after them" and "You know it was a toss-up whether I go in for diamonds or sing in the choir. The choir lost") in a melodramatic/comic story that involves white slavery and an unlikely romance between West (as Lady 'Diamond' Lou) and Salvation Army officer Captain Cummings (Cary Grant)

A Shot In the Dark (1964)

The visit of bumbling, linguistically-challenged French detective Inspector Jacques Clouseau (Peter Sellers) and resident French maid / suspected murderess Maria Gambrelli (Elke Sommer) to Camp Sunshine - a nudist resort - and their unclothed drive through the crowded streets of Paris; the line of Clouseau's exasperated, long-suffering and bug-eyed Chief Inspector Charles Dreyfus (Herbert Lom): "Give me ten men like Clouseau and I could destroy the world!"; also the scenes in which Clouseau rolls off the couch and struggles with the game of billiards, using an upturned cue stick and an uncooperative cue rack; Clouseau's pronunciation of the word 'bomb' ("beumb"); and his innumerable attempts to bed Maria - once with an untimely and inopportune interruption from Clouseau's own manservant and karate-chopping expert Kato (Burt Kwouk) who specializes in surprise attacks



Showgirls (1995)

The unintentionally cheesy acting and dialogue, such as Nomi Malone's (Elizabeth Berkley) violent, anti-social behavior and the exchange between Nomi and bisexual lead Vegas showgirl Cristal Connors (Gina Gershon) (Cristal: "You've got nice tits. I like nice tits." Nomi: "I like having nice tits"), and Tony Moss' (Alan Rachins) bare-breasted showgirl audition threat ("Come back when you've f--ked some of this baby fat off. See ya!"), and the thrashing scene of swimming pool sex


Shrek (2001)

The opening scene of the ogre Shrek (voice of Mike Myers) bathing in mud, brushing his teeth with caterpillar goo, and using the outhouse; the character of the wisecracking, talkative sidekick Donkey (voice of Eddie Murphy); the scene of a mechanical Information Booth featuring a spoof of Disney's sugary It's a Small World (It's a Perfect Place) with vaguely sarcastic wooden puppets; Donkey's romance with the female fire-breathing Dragon; the scene of villainous Lord Farquaad's (voice of John Lithgow) torture of the Gingerbread Man on a cookie sheet; and Donkey's quip after Lord Farquaad is eaten by a dragon: "Celebrity marriages! They never last, do they?"




Shrek 2 (2004)

The many filmic, fairy tale, nursery rhyme, and other cultural references sprinkled throughout the film - including Shrek (voice of Mike Myers) and Fiona's (voice of Cameron Diaz) honeymoon kiss in the beach surf, a parody of From Here to Eternity (others include nods to Flashdance, The Sound of Music, E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial, Spider-Man, etc.); also, the journey in an onion-carriage to the land of Far, Far Away (the Hollywood/Beverly Hills-inspired town with Farbucks and Old Knavery), with the extremely impatient Donkey (voice of Eddie Murphy) continually asking: "Are we there yet?"; also, the scene of a TV show called KNIGHTS - a parody of the TV show COPS - culminating with Puss In Boots (voice of Antonio Banderas) caught possessing an illegal narcotic - catnip; the Academy Awards red-carpet parody, complete with Joan Rivers (as Herself); and Donkey and Puss-In-Boots' celebratory rendition of "Livin' La Vida Loca", in the popular blockbuster sequel



Greatest Funniest Movie Moments and Scenes
(alphabetical order, by film title)
Introduction | Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 | Part 10
Part 11 | Part 12 | Part 13 | Part 14 | Part 15 | Part 16 | Part 17 | Part 18 | Part 19 | Part 20

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