Greatest Funniest Movie

Moments and Scenes


Title Screen
Movie Title/Year and Scene Descriptions

Babe (1995)

  • the remarkable talking animals (including the sheepdog, the duck, the elderly ewe, the trio of singing mice, and runty, orphaned piglet Babe)
  • the rousing, joyous and fun storybook finale in which sheep-herding, talking pig Babe was victorious (with the password Baah Ram Ewe) and outperformed all his competitors in the prestigious National Sheepdog Championships contest
  • the simple congratulatory words of kind-hearted, prideful owner Farmer Arthur Hoggett (James Cromwell): "That'll do, pig, that'll do"

Bananas (1971)

  • the opening scene of the play-by-play commentary of a Latin-American president's "live, on-the-spot assassination", in the Republic of San Marcos, on the outdoor palace steps for ABC's Wide World of Sports - provided by sportscaster announcer Howard Cosell (Himself), as he asked the dying leader: "Well, of course, you're upset, and that's understandable under the circumstances. l guess now you'll have to announce your retirement"
  • the scenes of clumsy, anxiety-ridden nerd Fielding Mellish (Woody Allen) serving as a guinea-pig for his company's strange inventions as a consumer product tester with a malfunctioning, sedentary exercise-machine ("The Execu-cisor")
  • aspiring playboy Fielding's nervous purchase of a porno magazine (camouflaged by other more intellectual publications such as Time Magazine, Commentary, Saturday Review, and Newsweek) and his embarrassment when a shop dealer made it obvious to other respectable, disapproving customers that he was purchasing a pornographic magazine - and his cringing when his order was screamed out by the clerk: ("Hey Ralph? How much is a copy of Orgasm?...Orgasm. This man wants to buy a copy. How much is it?"); Fielding stuttered: "Doing a sociological study on perversion. l'm up to advanced child molesting"
  • Fielding's unsuccessful attempt and cowardice to protect an old woman during a subway mugging by two thugs (including a young Sylvester Stallone in his screen debut)
  • his breakup with red-headed radical Nancy (Louise Lasser) and his whining: (Fielding: "How am I immature?" Nancy: "Well...intellectually, emotionally and sexually." Fielding: "Yeah, but in what other ways?")
  • the scenes of Fielding's involvement as a fake-bearded revolutionary guerrilla in the tiny Latin American banana republic of San Marcos as the guest of dictator Gen. Emilio M. Vargas (Carlos Montalban), and his capture by the guerrillas
  • the scene of nebbish Fielding viewing a half-naked woman clutching her left breast and crying out: "I got bitten by a snake" - after he had learned about first-aid treatment for snakebite: ("In the event of snake-bite, you make an incision and you suck out the poison - remember, you suck out the poison"); with a huge grin on his face, he pursued her greedily and lasciviously, and was followed by the rest of the rebel camp
  • the scene of a dinner toast when he tensely began chewing on his glass
  • his to-go ordering of almost one thousand grilled cheese sandwiches and seven hundred cups of coffee for his troops at a lunch counter during a South American revolution before being installed as El Presidente
  • the torture scene when soldiers forced a man to listen to the score of Naughty Marietta
  • the grossly inappropriate speech to upper class dignitaries given by Fielding, now El Presidente of San Marcos and wearing a ridiculous fake red beard, at a high society fundraiser: "Uh, we have more locusts than...uh, locusts of all races and creeds. These, these locusts, incidentally, are available at popular prices. And so, by the way, are most of the women of San Marcos..."
  • his US trial scene in which he cross-examined himself and objected to the judge during his trial for treason in the US: ("l object, Your Honor. This trial is a travesty. lt's a travesty of a mockery of a sham of a mockery of a travesty of two mockeries of a sham. l move for a mistrial. Do you realize there's not a single homosexual on that jury")
  • the closing televised Fielding Mellish Honeymoon Night broadcast (on Wide World of Sports) that was viewed as a boxing match by commentator Howard Cosell, in which Nancy admitted: "Well, Howard, it all went by so fast. I just had no idea that it would be so quick, really. I was expecting a longer bout... Well, as you know, l'm extraordinarily ticklish so l had a kind of a rough time there. l couldn't stop laughing...And you know, l thought it would really get in my way. But l really trained well for this and l think it sort of held me, so there really wasn't any time that l didn't feel in complete control." Then she added: "The timing was a little off, but l think he'll be fine. I mean, he's not the worst l've had. Not the best, but not the worst."

The Bank Dick (1940)

  • the words of advice given by Lompoc resident Egbert Souse (W.C. Fields) to his future son-in-law Og Oggilby (Grady Sutton) - "Surely, don't be a luddie-duddie, don't be a moon-calf, don't be a jabbernow, you're not those, are you?"
  • the scene when Egbert was hired as a vigilant bank security dick - he choked a young boy in a cowboy outfit waving a toy gun - believing that he was a holdup man - as the bratty boy walked out of the bank, he ridiculed the guard's shiny, bulbous red nose: "Mommy, doesn't that man have a funny nose?" His mother chided him for making fun: "You mustn't make fun of the gentleman, Clifford. You'd like to have a nose like that full of nickels, wouldn't you?"
  • Egbert's Black Pussy Cat Cafe drinking routine
  • Souse's use of a Mickey Finn to hold off effeminate, inquisitive and persistent bank examiner J. Pinkerton Snoopington (Franklin Pangborn)
  • and his memorable, zany, slapstick getaway car chase scene as a "hostage" with a terrified robber - it was a superbly-timed chase - the cars (Souse's car was followed by the local police, the bank president, and a representative from the movie company) zoomed and circled around, barely avoiding crashing into each other or other obstacles in the path - the getaway car careened through streets, over ditches (over the heads of ditchdiggers), around curves and up a mountainside, missing collisions at every turn with the pursuit vehicles.
  • when asked by the thug in the back seat to give him the wheel, Egbert matter-of-factly pulled it off the steering column and gave it to him
  • when the robber was struck unconscious and apprehended, Sousè was an unlikely hero once again for thwarting another heist


Beetlejuice (1988)

  • after a fatal car accident that killed the newly-wed Maitlands: Adam (Alec Baldwin) and Barbara (Geena Davis), the scene of their other-worldly (or netherworld) waiting room full of other recently-dead and distressed clients, especially the explorer with a shrunken head and ping pong ball eyes
  • the hosted dinner party (song and dance) scene of the recently-deceased Maitlands and their haunted 'parlor trick' in which they attempted to spook and dislodge the yuppie Deetz family, now living in their Connecticut home, by having obnoxious wife Delia Deetz (Catherine O'Hara) belt out the calypso "Day-O (The Banana Boat Song)" - in Harry Belafonte's voice
  • the character of goth, black-clad teenaged Deetz daughter, Lydia (Winona Ryder), a photographer, from Charles Deetz' (Jeffrey Jones) first marriage - and the object of Beetlejuice's affection, and the only living person who could see the ghostly Maitlands (whom she met when they were first wearing sheets) - she asked: "Are you gross under there? Are you Night of the Living Dead under there? Like all bloody veins and pus?"
  • the sight of Michael Keaton as the demonic, crude, yellow-haired, morbid, and over-the-top title character Betelgeuse (the "afterlife's leading bioexorcist") as a free-lance veteran scare-master, who advertised his services on television - "You Get a Free demon possession with Every Exorcism!"
  • the decaying view of Adam and Barbara - who after what they thought was a seance (conducted by the Deetz' interior designer Otho (Glenn Shadix)), were now transformed into exorcised, greenish decaying ghosts
  • the summoning of Beetlejuice by Lydia (by calling out his name three times) to help save the Maitlands in exchange for promising to marry him; with outstretched arms, he exhorted as lightning flashed: ("It's Showtime!") to get rid of Maxie Dean (Robert Goulet), Deetz's boss, and his wife, and also Otho; Beetlejuice grew inflated arms and propelled them through the ceiling (as if in a carnival's strong-man 'ring the bell' game)
  • the final scene in the waiting room with Betelgeuse's now-shrunken head (after a witch doctor sprinkled powder on him) and his hilarious, upbeat, but deadpanned statement about his messed-up hair: ("Whoa, hey! What are you doing? Hey, stop it! Hey, you're messing up my hair! C'mon! Whoa! Whoa! Stop it! Whoa! Hey, this might be a good look for me")
  • Lydia's pre-ending credits performance, suspended in mid-air, of "Jump in the Line (Shake Señora)", with singing by Harry Belafonte, after the Deetz's and the Maitlands found they could live in cooperative harmony in the house

Being There (1979)

  • the enigmatic character of illiterate, TV-watching gardener Chance the Gardener or Chauncey Gardiner (Peter Sellers) and his fool-turned-prophet transformation
  • black maid-cook Louise's (Ruth Attaway) cynical commentary on retarded Chance/Chauncey Gardiner's (Peter Sellers) rise to power
  • Dennis Watson's (Mitch Kreindel) hitting on Chauncey at a formal party with Chauncey's naive reply: "Is there a TV upstairs? I like to watch" and Dennis' delighted response: "You like to, uh, watch?... You wait right here. I'll go get Warren!"
  • Chauncey's simpleton lecture to President Bobby (Jack Warden) about how the garden grew: ("In a garden, growth has its season . . . as long as the roots are not severed, all will be well")
  • and the protracted "seduction scene" in which dying financier's wife Eve Rand (Shirley MacLaine), love-starved and seductive, desperately tried to arouse an unresponsive Chauncey - he only responded, with a shocking but understandable line, that he "like(s) to watch" - and "it's very good, Eve" and then sat on the end of the bed (oblivious to her) as she masturbated herself on the floor on top of a bear-skin rug
  • and the cryptic, mystical final shot of Chauncey strolling on water as his Presidential candidacy was discussed off-screen

Best in Show (2000)

  • the quirky and mockumentary interviews with different sets of neurotic and quirky dog owners, trainers, and pet psychologists, including salesman Gerry Fleck (Eugene Levy), cursed with two left feet (literally), and his wife Cookie (Catherine O'Hara) with their Norwich terrier "Winky" - and his astonishment when his wife admitted she had "hundreds" of boyfriends
  • the description of the relationship between young and very buxom trophy wife Sherri Ann Cabot (Jennifer Coolidge) and her very elderly 80 year-old husband Leslie (Patrick Cranshaw): ("We have an amazing relationship and it's very physical. I mean, he still pushes all my buttons. And uhm, you know, people say: 'Oh, but he's so much older than you.' And you know what? I'm the one having to push him away. We both have so much in common. We both love soup and uh, we love the outdoors, uh, we love snow peas, and uh, talking and not talking. Uh, we could not talk or talk forever and still find things to not talk about")
  • wealthy, materialistic, and neurotic dog owners - catalogue lovers Meg Swan (Parker Posey) and Hamilton Swan (Michael Hitchcock), with matching sets of braces, who met at Starbucks: ("Not at the same Starbucks but we saw each other at different Starbucks across the street from each other") who were worried with their therapist that their Weimaraner "Beatrice" had been traumatized and was depressed after watching them have experimental Kama Sutra style sex: ("We got a book, Kama Sutra. I lit some candles and, uh, played some music and got myself in a position that wasn't, uh, very easy for me emotionally. Uhm, it's called the congress of the cow, uh, where, uh, the woman is bent over, the hands are on the floor, and the man is behind")
  • the characters of Christy Cummings (Jane Lynch) and Sherri Ann Cabot who created a magazine titled "American Bitch" designed specifically for lesbian pure-bred dog owners
  • the scene of Harlan Pepper (Christopher Guest) traveling to the road show with his bloodhound, in which he told a story about how he drove his mother mad by his unique talent of naming nuts: ("I used to be able to name every nut that there was. And it used to drive my mother crazy, because she used to say, 'Harlan Pepper, if you don't stop namin' nuts,' and the joke was, of course, that we lived in Pine Nut, and I think that's what put it in my head at that - at that point. So I'd go to sleep - she'd hear me in the other room and she would just start yellin'. I'd say: 'Peanut. Hazelnut. Cashew nut. Macadamia nut.' That was the one that would send her into goin' crazy. She'd say: 'Would you stop namin' nuts!' And Hubert used to be able to make the sound, and he wasn't talkin', but he used to go "rrrawr rrawr" and it sounded like Macadamia nut. Pine nut, which is a nut, but it's also the name of a town. Pistachio nut. Red pistachio nut. Natural, all natural white pistachio nut")
  • the national dog show itself, the 125th annual Mayflower Kennel Club's competition for the "Best in Show", emceed by the comical TV commentator Buck Laughlin (Fred Willard) and his long-suffering co-host Trevor Beckwith (Jim Piddock): ("When you look at how beautiful these dogs are, and to think that in some countries these dogs are eaten," and "If you're gonna put them on a football team, which would be your wide receiver, which would be your tight end? Who can go the farthest, the fastest?", and "Look at Scott! He is prancing along with the dog! Man, I tell you something, if you live in my neighborhood and you're dressed like that, you'd better be a hotel doorman", and "I don't think I ever could get used to being probed and prodded. I told my proctologist once: 'Hey, why don't you take me out to dinner and a movie sometime?'")

Beverly Hills Cop (1984)

  • the character of comic, resourceful, street-smart renegade Detroit cop Axel Foley (on a working vacation in Southern California) by Eddie Murphy in this "fish-out-of-water" comedy
  • his loudmouth, streetwise character delivered fast-talking laughs in almost every scene

Big (1988)

  • the scenes of a 13 year-old boy Josh Baskin (David Moscow) in the "big" body of a thirty-year-old man (Tom Hanks) after his wish to be "big" at a carnival machine came true
  • the joyous foot-tapping Heart and Soul and Chopsticks tap dances of teenaged Josh Baskin with toy executive boss "Mac" MacMillan (Robert Loggia) on a giant, floor-sized and mounted electronic piano keyboard in the main showroom of an F.A.O. Schwartz toy store
  • Josh's reaction to the hors d'oeuvres (miniature corn cobs) at a fancy office cocktail party
  • Josh's confused sexual relationship with sexy yuppie toy executive Susan Lawrence (Elizabeth Perkins), a top-level co-worker, who had asked to spend the night for a 'sleep-over' in bunk beds; and the sharing of his bunk bed with her - Susan: "I want to spend the night with you." Josh: "Do you mean sleep over?" Susan: "Well... yeah!" Josh (with a guileless reply): "Well, okay... but I get to be on top!"
  • also the tender, simple and innocent scene in which he gently touched her breast through her bra before kissing her
  • and in the conclusion, the final shot of Josh, after waving goodbye to Susan, transformed into a 13 year-old boy again (with clothes that now didn't fit him) - he ran toward his home, calling out: "Mom?...I missed you all so much"

Big Business (1929)

  • the famous silent short (two-reeler) in which door-to-door Christmas tree salesmen Stan (Stan Laurel) and Ollie (Oliver Hardy) got into an escalating vindictive fight with a disgruntled homeowner (James Finlayson), and ended up destroying his home and yard while he destroyed their car (and tree), as a policeman and other neighbors calmly watched

Big Deal on Madonna Street (1958, It.) (aka I Soliti Ignoti)

  • a wacky, satirical crime caper about an amateurish, inept and incompetent group of Italians who planned the perfect crime that ultimately went very wrong - the robbery of a pawnshop, masterminded by womanizing boxer Peppe (Vittorio Gassman) and accompanied by unemployed cameraless photographer and baby-minding Tiberio (Marcello Mastroianni), young rookie thief Mario (Renato Salvatori), hot-tempered Sicilian Ferribote (Tiberio Murgia), ex-jockey Capannelle (Carlo Pisacane) - and the gang's mentor Dante Cruciani (Italian stage star Toto) who offered ridiculous lessons on safecracking
  • the climactic scene of the break-in ended up being a complete failure

The Big Lebowski (1998)

  • the opening assault by two debt-collector hoods (Mark Pellegrino) and Woo (Philip Moon), who alleged that bearded hippie, pot-smoking, slacker, unemployed slob Jeffrey 'The Dude' Lebowski (Jeff Bridges) in his Venice Beach (California) bungalow owed them money: ("Don't f--k with us! Your wife owes money to Jackie Treehorn. That means you owe money to Jackie Treehorn") - they roughed him up and then Woo peed on the Dude's favorite carpet: ("No, no, don't do that! Not on the rug, man"), but then after realizing he was the wrong individual took off: ("He looks like a f--kin' loser...F--king time wasted. Thanks a lot, asshole")
  • the Dude's commiseration with his bowling buddies, uptight nutcase Vietnam war veteran Walter Sobchak (John Goodman) and ex-surfer Donny (Steve Buscemi), about his ruined, valued rug ("Yeah, man, it really tied the room together") that was peeded upon by a Chinaman
  • the scene in which The Dude, wearing shorts and a T-shirt, complained and demanded compensation from wheel-chair bound philanthropist, Pasadena, CA millionaire Jeffrey 'The Big' Lebowski (David Huddleston), his namesake, for the mistaken attack by two hoods (due to a mix-up of addresses for "Lebowski"), that were really tarketing Mr. Lebowski's indebted wife
  • the Dude's introduction of himself to "The Big" Lebowski: ("You're Mr. Lebowski. I'm the Dude. So that's what you call me. You know, uh, that or, uh, His Dudeness, or uh, Duder, or uh, you know, El Duderino if you're not into the whole brevity thing")
  • Mr. Lebowski's employment advice to the laid-back Dude - who briefly answered: "Oh, F--k it!" and left: ("My wife is not the issue here! I hope that someday my wife will learn to live on her allowance, which is ample, but if she does not, that is her problem, not mine, just as the rug is your problem, just as every bum's lot in life is his own responsibility, regardless of who he chooses to blame. I didn't blame anyone for the loss of my legs. Some Chinaman took them from me in Korea. But I went out and achieved anyway. I cannot solve your problems, sir, only you can....Yes, that's your answer. That's your answer to everything. Tattoo it on your forehead. Your revolution is over, Mr. Lebowski! Condolences! The bums lost! My advice to you is to do what your parents did! Get a job, sir! The bums will always lose! Do you hear me, Lebowski?! The bums will always lose!")
  • on his way out of the Lebowski estate, the Dude's meeting up with the millionaire's sexy young trophy wife Bunny (Tara Reid), a free-spirited nymphomaniac, and one of the porn stars of sleaze king mobster Jackie Treehorn (Ben Gazzara), who offered: ("I'll suck your cock for $1,000 dollars")
  • the scene of living erotic art exhibited by Mr. Lebowski's estranged daughter Maude Lebowski (Julianne Moore), an eccentric, super-stoic, avante-garde feminist artist, who delivered a "vagina monologue": ("Does the female form make you uncomfortable, Mr. Lebowski?...My art has been commended as being strongly vaginal, which bothers some men. The word itself makes some men uncomfortable. Vagina....Yes, they don't like hearing it and find it difficult to say, whereas without batting an eye, a man will refer to his dick or his rod or his Johnson")
  • the Dude's fantasy musical dream sequence of bowling called Gutterballs after being slipped a mickey in his White Russian cocktail by Jackie Treehorn - filled with images including the Viking Queen, Saddam Hussein, and bowling
  • the bowling alley scene in which competitive, flamboyant Latino bowler Jesus Quintana (John Turturro) threatened: "Nobody f--ks with the Jesus..."
  • the other scary scene at the bowling alley in which the Dude's bowling buddy Walter told rival bowler Smokey (Jimmie Dale Gilmore) that he had committed a minor infraction of bowling league rules by fouling over the line - accompanied by gun-wielding threats: "You're entering a world of pain" and "Mark it zero"
  • the scene of the scattering of Donny's cremated ashes (in a Folger's coffee can), who had suffered a fatal heart attack, with Walter's rambling eulogy ("Donny was a good bowler and a good man. He was one of us. He was a man who loved the outdoors and bowling. And as a surfer, he explored the beaches of Southern California, from La Jolla to Leo Carrillo and up to Pismo. He died, he died, as so many men of his generation, before his time. In your wisdom, Lord, you took him, as you took so many bright, flowering young men at Khe Sanh, at Lan Doc, and Hill 364. These young men gave their lives. So did Donny. Donny who loved bowling. And so, Theodore Donald Karabatsos, in accordance with what we think your dying wishes might well have been, we commit your final mortal remains to the bosom of the Pacific Ocean, which you loved so well. Good night, sweet prince"); however, the breeze blew the ashes back - and all over the Dude's face

Greatest Funniest Movie Moments and Scenes
(alphabetical order, by film title)
Intro | A1 | A2 | B1 | B2 | C | D | E-F | G | H-I | J-K-L
M1 | M2 | N-O | P1 | P2 | Q-R | S1 | S2 | T | U-V-W-X-Y-Z

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